Looking Back: The Libel Show


Libel is here! Libel is here! Extra, extra read all about the Libels of the past!

Law Weekly staff

 

“In fact, I’d go so far as to say that every student at U.Va. Law should be required to attend at least one Libel Show during their tenure here… The most valuable thing about the Libel Show is that it allows you to think, if only for a few hours, that law school is not the end of everything that is good in life.” Dan Gocek ’11, “Libel Shows Its Show,” Virginia Law Weekly, Friday, March 26, 2010.

PSA to all those gunners out there that think they’re “getting ahead” of their classmates by skipping one of the best events during their law school career. Inside jokes will be made Thursday-Saturday, and if you don’t come, you risk being on the outside forever.

 

A production number on “The Wizard of Oz” featured Bernie Feord ‘88 as the Tin Man (Professor Charles Goetz); Fred Wagner ‘87 as the Scarecrow (Professor Michael Dooley); Mikki Graves (now Wasler) ‘88 as Dorothy (Professor Mildred Robinson); Mike Callahan ‘88 as the Lion (Professor Cal Woodard). Photo Credit law.virginia.edu.

A production number on “The Wizard of Oz” featured Bernie Feord ‘88 as the Tin Man (Professor Charles Goetz); Fred Wagner ‘87 as the Scarecrow (Professor Michael Dooley); Mikki Graves (now Wasler) ‘88 as Dorothy (Professor Mildred Robinson); Mike Callahan ‘88 as the Lion (Professor Cal Woodard). Photo Credit law.virginia.edu.

“This year’s [professor] performance consisted of three songs, one focusing on the ban of laptops in classrooms from the professors’ point of view, on[e] about the joys of being a law student, and a chilling tune entitled ‘The Economy, It is a Tankin’.’” Jessica Brown ’10, “Libel Show Delivers Laughs,” Virginia Law Weekly, Friday, March 27, 2009.

A joke about the economy in 2009? Law School professors are savage. I’m glad (most of) the professors have finally accepted they lost the war against laptops—my improved Tetris skills thank them.

 

“While most were pondering why the circus had overrun the Law School yet again, we pondered a different question: Who were these people? Among the familiar faces on stage stood at least a half-dozen people we had never seen before. Perhaps, we wondered in our state of innocence, alumni participated in these affairs. Skimming the program as quickly as possible, the true identities of these purported interlopers became apparent. They were second semester 3Ls!” Law Weekly Staff, “Libel Show Liable for Nothing,” Virginia Law Weekly, Friday, March 30, 2007.

The Law Weekly staff would like to encourage all of this year’s 3Ls to follow in the footsteps of their predecessors and stop coming to class. Stop trying to break the curve and enjoy your last chance at extended vacation before moving into the top floor of a NYC skyscraper.

 

“The Old School adaptation was not as well-integrated into the rest of the show as last year’s Office Space-inspired video (flashback: Professors Jim Ryan, John Harrison, and Anup Malani take a baseball bat to a wireless card). Still, the professors relished their roles, with a standout performance by Professor Cohen that is best summarized in two words: ribbon dance.” Irene Noguchi ’06, “Good Game, Larry & Junta,” Virginia Law Weekly, Friday, April 1, 2005.

Is the past predicting the future? Will President Ryan make an appearance in this year’s show? Will Professor Cohen bring the ‘ribbon dance’ back? Only time will tell.

 
A Coarse Line, or Alice Well That Ends Well, concerned the careers, from admission to graduation, of six typical law students (wahoo, bookworm, idealist, instate jock, Yalie, and the innocent Alice Purebody) and the search of Emmo’s men for a snark, a ‘mythical female creature who teaches law.’ But the plot was a mere backdrop for the humor, which only occasionally overstepped the bounds of good-natured libel, and the music, complete with clever lyrics and arrangements, and exceptionally strong voices.” Peter Hursh, “Libel Show Has Talent, Humor ‘A Coarse Line’ Earns A-Plus,” Virginia Law Weekly, Friday, April 22, 1977.

In the words of our beloved Molly Brady, you either die a Yale Law School Law Revue director or live long enough to become a UVA Law Libel Show sketch.